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    SIGN UP FOR ON-WATER INFORMATION

    If you plan to get on the water amongst the action, then register your details below to stay updated with the latest information from the America’s Cup Event and to be in the running for spot prizes including event related product and merchandise.

    SIGN UP FOR ON-WATER INFORMATION
    If you plan to get on the water amongst the action, then register your details below to stay updated with the latest information from the America’s Cup Event and to be in the running for spot prizes including event related product and merchandise.

    If you plan to get on the water and amongst the action, then register your details to receive the latest information on courses and on-water information pre-and during the event. 

     
  • Media ID-2793

    LOCATION OF RACE COURSES

    The racing area covers a wide swath of the Hauraki Gulf, with five race courses being identified depending on the weather conditions. The race course will be communicated on racing days by the Race Management depending on wind direction, intensity, and tides. GPS coordinates, nautical maps and detailed information for on-water spectators will be available on americascup.com closer to the event.

    LOCATION OF RACE COURSES
    The racing area covers a wide swath of the Hauraki Gulf, with five race courses being identified depending on the weather conditions. The race course will be communicated on racing days by the Race Management depending on wind direction, intensity, and tides. GPS coordinates, nautical maps and detailed information for on-water spectators will be available on americascup.com closer to the event.

    The designated areas in the Hauraki Gulf and Waitematā Harbour offer a wide range of race course options, with a full range of wind directions and conditions. On top of that, the harbour and gulf are surrounded by geographical landmarks that provide a variety of vantage points for spectators.

    Media ID-2793
  • Media ID-2795Media ID-2621Media ID-2619Media ID-2615Media ID-2616Media ID-2617Media ID-2618Media ID-2614

    RACE COURSE MARKS

    The 36th America’s Cup race courses will be delimited by a clear boundary and spectator crafts will not be permitted to operate in proximity to it.

    RACE COURSE MARKS
    The 36th America’s Cup race courses will be delimited by a clear boundary and spectator crafts will not be permitted to operate in proximity to it.

    In order to identify where the course is positioned, each corner of the racing area will be marked with a yacht that has a high visibility tube on the forestay. The courses will be further marked on each side with a series of conic bright orange buoys. Each buoy will also be numbered, odd numbers down one side, evens on the other, so if required spectators can easily identify and communicate their location.

     

  • Media ID-2792

    RESTRICTED AIRSPACE

    The America’s Cup restricted airspace is designated by the Director of Civil Aviation under Civil Aviation Rule Part 71. Drones are not permitted above the Race Village at any time during the event. On race days drones are not to be flown over water… leave it to the experts to capture the best footage while you sit back, relax and enjoy the racing.

    RESTRICTED AIRSPACE
    The America’s Cup restricted airspace is designated by the Director of Civil Aviation under Civil Aviation Rule Part 71. Drones are not permitted above the Race Village at any time during the event. On race days drones are not to be flown over water… leave it to the experts to capture the best footage while you sit back, relax and enjoy the racing.

    America’s Cup Restricted Airspace

    The America’s Cup restricted airspace consists of four distinct areas.  One area above the Cup Village that will be permanently active for the duration of the event, and three overwater areas above the race courses that will be selectively activated on race days based upon which racecourse is selected by the Regatta Director. 

    The area above the Cup Village will extend from the surface to 1500 feet AMSL, all three areas above the racecourses will extend from the surface to 2000 feet AMSL.

    When is the Restricted Airspace Active?

    The restricted airspace above the Cup Village will be permanently active for the duration of the event. 

    On each race day, immediately following the Regatta Director’s selection of which race course will be used, ACE will request the NOTAM Office activate the applicable restricted area. 

    The activation period will be from 15 minutes prior to the First Warning Signal until 15 minutes after the last permitted race finish time. 

    Restricted Airspace Inquiries

    Please direct any inquiries about operating within the America’s Cup restricted airspace to airspace@americascup.com.

    Media ID-2792
  • Media ID-2776

    FOLLOW SAFELY #AC36FORALL

    We want everyone to enjoy the racing. For those with smaller boats, watercraft like paddleboards wanting to see the sailing your best and safest bet will be via the many on-land viewings spots, various screens set up throughout Auckland and from your phones or TVs. If you're out on the water, make sure you've got your safety checklist ticked.

    FOLLOW SAFELY #AC36FORALL
    We want everyone to enjoy the racing. For those with smaller boats, watercraft like paddleboards wanting to see the sailing your best and safest bet will be via the many on-land viewings spots, various screens set up throughout Auckland and from your phones or TVs. If you're out on the water, make sure you've got your safety checklist ticked.

    General safety, speed, and transit land information

    Vessels are reminded of the risks to craft by generated wake.

    • On any day a course is being used for the event-related racing, the 5 Knot Restriction will apply only to the "Orange" hashed area as indicated in the courses chart extract. Download the speed limit restriction charts:

    DOWNLOAD CHART RACECOURSE A
    DOWNLOAD CHART RACECOURSE B
    DOWNLOAD CHART RACECOURSE C
    DOWNLOAD CHART RACECOURSE D
    DOWNLOAD CHART RACECOURSE E

    • All vessels are requested to the north of the area indicated by the RED shape to enable ferries to navigate safely while event speed restrictions apply.

    Transit Lanes

    • Can be used by any powered vessel where the master deems it safe to do so.
    • Marked Transit lanes have been surveyed to a depth of 2.5-meter Chart Datum.
    • Vessels using Transit lanes must maintain a speed of 5 knots.
    • Where transit lanes exist and they are within a 5-knot restricted area as indicated by the chart for that particular course, vessel operators are reminded at all times that they are not permitted to stop or reverse course in the lane and must keep to starboard.
    • The event strongly discourages the use of non-powered craft in the indicated speed restriction zones.
    • Sailing Vessels are not permitted to operate in the speed restricted zone as indicated when in force with sails hoisted.
    • Speed restrictions will generally apply from 1pm (13:00 hours) until 7pm (19:00) hours each race day unless lifted earlier.
    • Lifting of event speed restrictions will be announced on Marine VHF channels 12 and 16.

    Safe Boating Reminders

    What’s your plan? Before going out on the water to enjoy the racing, make sure you prep your vessel and equipment, check your gear to be sure it’s in good working order, and know the rules and local conditions where you’re going.

    Wear your lifejacket. This is the single most important thing to do to help keep yourself safe on the water. Lifejackets are legally required at all times on boats six metres or less in length. Skippers must have lifejackets of the right size and type for everyone on board.

    Be a responsible skipper.
    If you’re the skipper, you’re legally responsible for the safety of the boat and everyone on board.

    Take two waterproof ways to communicate.
    If you can’t call for help, then no one can rescue you.

    Avoid alcohol.
    Stay sharp on the water. Drinking affects your judgement and reactions if something goes wrong.

    Check the marine weather forecast.
    It’s not the same as land and general forecasts, the weather will be different on the water and can change suddenly.

    Keep an active look out.
    On-water congestion is likely to happen on race days, increasing the risk of collision or wake that can overturn vessels.

    Be aware of your wake and big waves caused by other boats.
    Keep your distance and don’t get too close to other boats.

    Understand and operate within the speed limits
    – the maximum speed permitted for all boats is 5 knots (about 9 km/h) within 200 metres of shore or any boat with a dive flag, and within 50 metres of any other boat or swimmer. Speeding in congested areas is dangerous and can cause serious injuries to others.

    Maritime NZ may investigate on-water incidents and there will be consequences for any skippers found to have broken the law.

    For those with smaller boats, watercraft like paddleboards wanting to see the sailing your best and safest bet will be via the many on-land viewing spots, various screens set up throughout Auckland and from their phones/TVs.

    Media ID-2776
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    MARINE LIFE

    The event and all teams take the protection of the biodiversity of the marine life of the Hauraki Gulf as a priority every day they go on the water. Marine life in the Hauraki Gulf (and Hauraki Gulf Marine Park) supports a wide range of marine life, many of which are of conservation significance. If you are part of the Event spectator fleet, be aware that you may see or have a close encounter with one of the different species of marine life that inhabit the Hauraki Gulf. Ensure you operate your vessel with ‘respect’ to marine life that you see and keep your distance. Do not allow your passengers to harass, disturb or feed marine life close to your vessel in any way.

    MARINE LIFE
    The event and all teams take the protection of the biodiversity of the marine life of the Hauraki Gulf as a priority every day they go on the water. Marine life in the Hauraki Gulf (and Hauraki Gulf Marine Park) supports a wide range of marine life, many of which are of conservation significance. If you are part of the Event spectator fleet, be aware that you may see or have a close encounter with one of the different species of marine life that inhabit the Hauraki Gulf. Ensure you operate your vessel with ‘respect’ to marine life that you see and keep your distance. Do not allow your passengers to harass, disturb or feed marine life close to your vessel in any way.


     

  • Media ID-3360

    BIOSECURITY - PEST FREE HAURAKI GULF

    The Hauraki Gulf has diverse ecosystems that boast a rich diversity of island habitats with native forests and precious wildlife. Many Auckland's and visitors to our city enjoy travelling to these unique locations, or spend time on the water around them. The Hauraki Gulf is protected under the Regional Pest Management Strategy 2007 (soon to be the Regional Pest Management Plan 2019) with the Hauraki Gulf Controlled Area Notice.

    BIOSECURITY - PEST FREE HAURAKI GULF
    The Hauraki Gulf has diverse ecosystems that boast a rich diversity of island habitats with native forests and precious wildlife. Many Auckland's and visitors to our city enjoy travelling to these unique locations, or spend time on the water around them. The Hauraki Gulf is protected under the Regional Pest Management Strategy 2007 (soon to be the Regional Pest Management Plan 2019) with the Hauraki Gulf Controlled Area Notice.

    The inner Gulf is also part of the “Hauraki Gulf Marine Park” which protects both public and private land as well as marine reserves within its boundaries. Thanks to animal pest control and eradication programmes run by both Auckland Council and the Department of Conservation, an increasing number of these islands are now entirely free of exotic animal pests, providing safe homes for many of New Zealand’s precious native plants and animals. Help keep pests out of the Hauraki Gulf. Check for pests before you leave home. Pests can easily injure or kill our native wildlife and compete for their food. Invasive weeds can alter the habitat that wildlife needs to survive. The most likely way pest animals and plants can invade our treasured islands is by stowing away on or in your footwear or gear, or on your vessel or kayak.
     

FAQs

  • Can I watch the racing from my own boat?

    There will be heaps of us who want a piece of the on water action so we really only encourage you to go out on the water if you have a vessel that is 5m or longer. So that we can ensure the teams have the best on-water stadium to race in, we need your help to operate in a smart and safe way when out on the water.

  • Where can I launch my boat?

    Find a boat ramp here. We expect it’s going to get busy at boat ramps so give yourself plenty of time to launch your boat, park your car and slowly head out to the race course. Roads surrounding boat ramps will be busy and parking will be limited.

  • What time should we be in position if we want to watch the racing on the water?

    The earlier the better! There are going to be so many boats out on the water you’re going to want to make sure you get your spot. Racing starts at 1500 for the Challenger Series and the course will be set up approximately 1400h.

  • What are the on-water rules?

    Standard Maritime Law and Rules apply. Download the app Marine Mate to have the Navigation Safety By Laws on hand. 

  • What are Transit Lanes?

    As some of the courses will block movement on the habour buoyed channels have been installed at key locations to allow vessels to move past the race courses.